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After all, if I’d expressed similar concerns about the paper ballot votes, HRM could have pointed to lists of people who were present in the polling booths authenticating the propriety of the voting processes, to audited trails accounting for the movements of all the filled ballot boxes and to counting processes with independent witnesses present.

In principle, I could even go see and count those ballots one-by-one myself.

I obtained the damning documents through an Access to Information request to the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre (CCIRC) of Public Safety Canada—the federal government agency charged with helping ensure internet safety.

Outside court, Fraser said he wants the law sent back to the legislature to rewrite the definition of cyberbullying.

That's something that can be done by declaring the law invalid for a period of time, he added.

Although the documents were heavily censored, they made clear that right up until the day before online voting began on October 6, 2012, an outside security researcher, the CCIRC, the election software vendor (Scytl) and the Halifax Regional Municipality Elections Office were grappling with a myriad of security vulnerabilities.

The documents also made clear that, at the time online voting began, only “some” of those security holes had been in part “mitigated.” Some of the problems, evidently, were never addressed. I asked the CCIRC, Scytl and the city to provide evidence that the security problems were solved and the online votes were securely, correctly recorded.

Darren Pittman/THE CANADIAN PRESS An anti-cyberbullying law drafted in response to the Rehtaeh Parsons case was defended Thursday as necessary to fill in significant gaps in the criminal law.

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Halifax revenge porn